Mass Grave Pictures

Mass Grave Pictures, NYC based indie horror film productions.  #supportindiehorror 

Shooting A New Short With A New Crew!

This past weekend, we shot a new short film, and did so with an entirely new crew than we had worked with before. First time working with a pro DP (Philip Kral who you can hear on the Cinematography Panel from Macabre Faire episode) and the 2nd time with a pro sound mixer, Brian Neris. 

So, this week we discuss the shoot, how the entire day went, how we handled new the responsibilities and delegations, and what we still have left to do. We talk some of the new parts of the post-production workflow and color grading process. 

In the final portion of the show, we give our thoughts on the long-term plans we have for ourselves and the importance of looking at your films as body of work, rather than attempting to pack everything you want into one film. 

Subscribe to us on iTunesStitcherYouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any questions, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.

You can also now follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/filmmakingpodcast!
#FilmmakingSucks

Join the Indie Filmmaker Community on Facebook: facebook.com/groups/1798997870171718/

Listen to the HorrorHappens Radio show for current news and interviews from the genre film festivals and conventions you should have on your radar: horrorhappens.com

Sign up for ProductionNext via beta.productionnext.com/filmmakingsucks

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Filmmaking is a completely imperfect art form that takes years and, over those years, the movie tells you what it is. Mistakes happen, accidents happen and true great films are the results of those mistakes and the decisions that those directors make during those moments.
— Jason Reitman

Filmmaking On A Budget Panel

This week, we bring you the Filmmaking On A Budget panel from the Macabre Faire Film Festival, featuring indie directors Patrick Devaney, Jeremiah Kipp, and Jerry Landi. 

Whether making films on the budget of a pizza dinner, two days of shooting for 10 months of post production, to working with Hollywood actors, at the end of the day the only thing that matters is finishing the film. Patrick, Jerry and Jeremiah discuss their ups and downs of producing low-budget films over the last decade and more.

Scrubbing race cars out of your sound, ADR, mobile greenscreens, zombies on the beach, creature creation, artistic filmmaking, shorts vs features, making money, losing money, and everything in between. If you have the slightest inclination to make your own films, this panel proves that you CAN do it yourself! 

You can find Patrick Devaney here: https://www.patrickdevaneyactor.com/

You can find Jeremiah Kipp here: http://www.kippfilms.com/main.html

You can find Jerry Landi here: https://www.facebook.com/REDEYERIPS/

Subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any questions, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.

You can also now follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/filmmakingpodcast!
#FilmmakingSucks

Join the Indie Filmmaker Community on Facebook: facebook.com/groups/1798997870171718/

Listen to the HorrorHappens Radio show for current news and interviews from the genre film festivals and conventions you should have on your radar: horrorhappens.com

Sign up for ProductionNext via beta.productionnext.com/filmmakingsucks

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I just want to make films that have enough of a budget to pull off high-level imagery but also have a budget that is low enough that I can do what I want.
— Neill Blomkamp
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ProductionNext w/Jim Miller & Ben Yennie

Production management software is popping up all over, from the veterans like MovieMagic to newb's like Celtx, it's hard to decide which one is best for your needs. This week, we talk to Jim Miller & Ben Yennie, creators of ProductionNext, which is a Cloud-based all-in-one platform, working to meet all of your production management needs. 

Discussing with them the uses of the program, we get deep into how it can help your productions, be they 4-8 member crews with limited budgets like ours, or 100 crews with 6 figure+ budgets. Keep track of your crews inventory, create srotyboards, write and maintain a budget amongst crew members, schedule your shoot days, and keep everyone up-to-speed on the progress of the film from pre-production all the way through post.

If you sign up for ProductionNext, use the link beta.productionnext.com/filmmakingsucks to get three free months added to your service. 

Ben Yennie was VP of Sales for Taal, a mobile video interview platform for the hospitality industry. He is the founder of Producer Foundry, a center for workshops, networking, and entrepreneurial training for film and video producers.

Jim Miller brings a deep understanding of user experience, interaction design and development, and Internet communities from a career spent at Apple, HP Labs, Gateway, and, most recently, as an independent design and development consultant. 

As always, subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any questions, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.

You can also now follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/filmmakingpodcast!
#FilmmakingSucks

Join the Indie Filmmaker Community on Facebook: facebook.com/groups/1798997870171718/

Listen to the HorrorHappens Radio show for current news and interviews from the genre film festivals and conventions you should have on your radar: horrorhappens.com

Sign up for ProductionNext via beta.productionnext.com/filmmakingsucks

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Have you ever noticed some people are able to stay organized while getting a massive quantity of work accomplished, while others appear to be busy but never actually produce results? Time management is the key to becoming a successful entrepreneur.
— Clay Clark

Dealing With Rejection

Rejection is probably the toughest part of being an artist. Peers, audiences, film festivals, distributors, everyone has an opinion on your work, and a lot of the time, it's not very positive. But, that comes with the territory and, many times, the way you deal with your rejections defines the path you will take.

This week, we have a very honest discussion on many of the rejections we have received recently, how we have handled them and how we use the lessons we've learned to decide the direction we want to go in next. 

As always, subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any questions, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.

You can also now follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/filmmakingpodcast!
#FilmmakingSucks

Join the Indie Filmmaker Community on Facebook: facebook.com/groups/1798997870171718/

Listen to the HorrorHappens Radio show for current news and interviews from the genre film festivals and conventions you should have on your radar: horrorhappens.com

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We all learn lessons in life. Some stick, some don’t. I have always learned more from rejection and failure than from acceptance and success.
— Henry Rollins

Latino Filmmaker Panel from Macabre Faire Film Festival

This week, we bring you the Latino Filmmaker panel from the Macabre Faire Film Festival. Hosted by Manny Serrano, and featuring filmmakers Edwin Pagan and Christian Moran, horror super-fan and actress Ines Peek also joined us for the talk. 
UPDATE: there was a minute or two of overlapping audio on the original upload, it has been fixed, so if you want, you can re-download the fixed audio version.

While much of Hollywood is currently fighting for equality of female and black filmmakers, one of the most marginalized groups in American film today are Latino and Hispanic filmmakers. Making up less than 4% of characters in films in Hollywood, the Hispanic perspective on life is one that is not told very often, and is generally overlooked. 

In an eye-opening panel, we discuss the hardships Latinos face growing up in America, and not seeing themselves and their identities portrayed truthfully in American cinema. 

Edwin Pagan tells about how he started the website LatinHorror.com and how it has become a central hub for a community that he, and many others, did not the extent to which it existed before the website came to be. Christian Moran talks about his career, from writing faux-sequels to films when he was young and filming them with his siblings, to his new Proxies Of Fear film series which strives to give a platform to Latino and other minority filmmakers in New Jersey.

Bringing in more of a viewers perspective, Ines Peek lends her thoughts on her experiences watching horror films as a child and a teenager, and how it has fueled her love for the genre and film festivals today. She also describes how the lack of representation in films may bottle-necked the opportunities for her to follow her aspirations of becoming an actress, via the lack of roles available to audition for, to very minimal support from friends and family telling her that it was possible.

You can find Edwin Pagan and follow him at LatinHorror.com.

Follow Christian Moran on Facebook here: facebook.com/cmoran29/ and his new film Lets Play Dead Girl here: facebook.com/letsplaydeadgirl/

You can find Ines Peek on Facebook here: www.facebook.com/ines.kirchenko

As always, subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any questions, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.

You can also now follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/filmmakingpodcast!
#FilmmakingSucks

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I became an actor to change the way I grew up. The way I grew up, I never saw myself on screen. I would look at the screen and think, ‘Well, there’s no way I can do it, because I’m not there.’ And it’s like as soon as you follow your dreams, you give other people the allowance to follow theirs. And for me, to look on younger girls and to say, ‘Well, Gina’s like me, maybe not necessarily the same skin color, maybe not necessarily the same background, but like that’s me. I’m not alone. I can do it too.’
— Gina Rodriguez

Writing and Scheduling A Shoot (6-week goal updates!)

Happy Valentines Day everyone! We all know that just because it's a holiday (sort of) that doesn't mean the hustle ends, so here we are with some updates! At the beginning of the year, we set some 6-week goals for ourselves, and today is our progress report! Meager they may have been, the tasks of writing a script and scheduling a shoot (respectively) came with their own woes, and we're gonna confess them to you. 

Over the last six weeks, we've had two major hurdles. One being compatible screenwriting software, and how do you prep for a shoot when you've never seen the location? So, we talk about the obstacles we've been dealing with lately, and then decide on what our next 6-week goal will be, and brush on what we want to do in the long term as filmmakers, and the next few months for the podcast.

We also briefly discuss LUTs in this episode a bit, and we talk about in-camera LUTs, which was just used as a comparison to the in-camera color profiles. Camera profiles are not LUTs, but they are a similar concept. For a more in-depth explanation of what a LUT is, check out this article at NoFilmSchool: https://nofilmschool.com/2011/05/what-is-a-look-up-table-lut-anyway

As always, subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any questions, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.

You can also now follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/filmmakingpodcast!
#FilmmakingSucks

Women In Horror Panel from Macabre Faire

Happy Women In Horror Month! January 12th, 2018 was the 2nd Annual Women In Horror Panel at the Macabre Faire Film Festival in Ronkonkoma, NY. Featuring Director/Producer Lindsay Serrano, Actress/Director Angie Hansen, Director/SFX Artist Shiva Rodriguez, Cinematographer/Director Jill Poisson, and Actress/Producer Lowry B. Fawley, and hosted by Manny Serrano, the panel discusses many of the ups and downs of being a woman working in the horror industry.

Covering feature filmmaking, first projects, the unbalanced amount of male directors vs female directors, female-centric tropes in horror films, female killers in films, along with many other topics. 

Be a part of Women In Horror Month by using the hashtags #WiHM9 #WiHM #WomenInHorror and #WiH! 

As always, subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any questions, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.
You can also now follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/filmmakingpodcast!
#FilmmakingSucks

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photo by Gail Wisun-Gooch

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Photo by Robert M. Jackson.

I don’t go up to another film director and say, Boy, you are a great male film director.’ So what’s curious to me is why it’s so gender specific with me. I get a lot of questions about ‘How could you make a film with this kind of subject matter?’ How could you do this as a woman and a mother?’ My answer: women can be terrible! Have you ever been to high school? Girls have as much love in them as they have viciousness because they’re human beings. Violence and horror films are not gender specific.
— Jennifer Lynch

Producing an $8000 Feature Film w/Joe Badon

Producing a low-budget feature can easily be one of the most daunting undertakings you will ever experience, but also the most rewarding. The crash-course in filmmaking you receive will be unlike any other. This week on the show we talk with Writer/Producer/Director Joe Badon about his upcoming feature film "The God Inside My Ear."

With a budget of $8000, and not a penny more, Joe wrote his script, assembled a cast & crew, and over the course of a few weeks, shot his first feature film. Starting out with how he got into filmmaking and working as a storyboard artist, into where he found his actors, his crew, locations, and finally onto how in the hell he managed to keep the budget so damn low! 

You can find Joe Badon on Facebook, and find the film here: https://www.facebook.com/thegodinsidemyear/ where you can watch the trailer and follow its progress. God Inside My Ear will be hitting festivals this year, so look out for it! 

As always, subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any questions, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.
You can also now follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/filmmakingpodcast!
#FilmmakingSucks

 

 

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“When I meet with recent film school graduates, I remind them that whatever happens next in the industry won’t be something my generation does. It will happen among the 20-somethings, the narrative entrepreneurs who figure out how to make the next great thing. Rather than seeking permission to work in the existing industry, they’ll make their own.”
— John August

Cinematography w/ Jill Poisson & Phil Kral

Filmmaking is a visual medium, obviously. So it goes without saying that choosing the right cinematographer is essential in telling your story properly. 

At the Macabre Faire Film Festival, Manny was lucky enough to have hosted multiple panels, one of which was The Art Of Cinematography, with two extremely talented D.P's in Phil Kral and Jill Poisson. Discussing a range of topics starting with how they became cinematographers to defining a "film look," working with multiple directors, and how to create a visual style over the span of a career. 

You can find work by Phil Kral at www.philipkral.com and Jill Poisson at www.jpoisson.com. Be sure to check them out and follow them on social media!

Subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any questions, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.
You can also now follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/filmmakingpodcast!
#FilmmakingSucks

 

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I like movies where you can come back and re-watch them and admire the cinematography 25 years later.
— Rob Zombie

BONUS: Ancillary Content with 4Mile Circus at Ax Wound Film Festival

At the Ax Wound film Festival, Lindsay sat in on a live Podcast recording for 4Mile Circus, who are not only an awesome podcast you should all check out, but they are also a production team based out of Brooklyn, NY! 

On this panel, hosted by Nicole Solomon and Sean Mannion, Lindsay, Monika Estrella Negra and Christina Raia discuss how to use ancillary content to promote your film, be it through podcasts, behind the scenes interviews, on-set tutorials of how you accomplished certain scenes, or just by simply using social media as often as possible while on set. 

Listen in and let us know what you think, and subscribe to the 4Mile Circus Podcast at 4milecircus.com, which we were guests on last week! Big thanks to Nicole and Sean for letting us include this on our feed! 

Subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any questions, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.
You can also now follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/filmmakingpodcast!
#FilmmakingSucks

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How To Build A Following w/4MileCircus

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Social Media! That ever elusive combination lock that we all struggle to get right. How to get followers, how to get shares, how to get likes, how to get people to pay attention to you and your film! Well, this week, we sit down with Sean Mannion and Nicole Solomon at 4MileCircus and discuss exactly that.

4MileCircus is a media company who offer their services in video production, social media management, teaching workshops, training seminars and more, all to help you create better content. They share a few of their methods on how to create a social media following for your first film. 

Don't forget to listen to the 4MileCircus podcast for this week as well, which feature Manny and Lindsay discussing making their first film, and a few other choice subjects which harp on why, sometimes, Filmmaking Sucks.

And a huge thanks to Sean and Nicole for usage of their equipment for this episode! Check them out at 4milecircus.com and see how they can help you make good films!

Subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any questions, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.
You can also now follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/filmmakingpodcast!
#FilmmakingSucks

 

The first rule of social media is that everything changes all the time. What won’t change is the community’s desire to network.
— Kami Huyse
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Staying Motivated and Creating Goals

Happy New Year everyone! Today marks the one-year anniversary of the first episode of Filmmaking Sucks AND the first episode of the new year, so we decided to do a bit of a year end wrap-up.

A huge part of this struggle is keeping yourself motivated in the face of so much rejection and, plain and simple, a lack of time. Between working to pay the bills, and shooting your films on weekends, how do you find the time to actually promote yourself at events? You lose sleep, you lose a social life and essentially free time as a whole. The road to getting noticed is definitely a long-game. It takes 20 years to become an overnight success, so you have to plan to put the time in, and try to not focus on doing too much at once. 

This week we will talk about some of our personal goals and how we budget some of our time in order to always keep ourselves working towards our long-term goals. 

You can catch us next weekend, Jan 12th-14th at the Macabre Faire Film Festival, where Lindsays film "Beneath" will be screening on Saturday and Sunday. Lindsay will also be part of the Women In Horror Panel, and Manny will be hosting the Cinematography Panel, featuring Jill Poisson and Phil Kral. Go to MacabreFaireFilmFest.com to buy tickets!

Subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any questions, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.
You can also now follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/filmmakingpodcast!
#FilmmakingSucks

 

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I hope that in this year to come, you make mistakes. Because if you are making mistakes, then you are making new things, trying new things, learning, living, pushing yourself, changing yourself, changing your world. You’re doing things you’ve never done before, and more importantly, you’re doing something.
— Neil Gaiman

Ax Wound Film Festival Filmmakers Panel

The 3rd annual Ax Wound Film Festival is a celebration of Women in Horror, and Lindsay's new film Beneath was selected to be part of the festival.

Hosted by Jay Kay of Horror Happens Radio, the panel includes Lindsay Serrano, Julia K. Berkey (Gemmas Monster), Aislinn Clarke (Childer), Stee McMorris (Strange Harvest), England Simpson (Prelude: A Love Story), Kathryn McManus (Knock Knock II), Jennifer Bonior & Dycee Wildman (Inside The House), Marinah Janello (Entropia), Nicole Solomon (Mare), Monika Estrella Negra (Flesh), and Christina Raia (Enough).

The panel discusses what it's like to be a woman working in media, and especially the horror industry. Their thoughts on the Ax Wound Film Festival and other female-centric festivals, as well as working with practical effects, the importance of being subversive towards the mainstream, and guerrilla filmmaking.

You can check out the Ax Wound Film Festival at the Women In Horror Month Website. Submissions for the 2018 fest open in a few months. Whether you are accepted or not, whether you are a male or female filmmaker, we advise you all to strongly consider making the trip out to Vermont to be part of the festival. 

Subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any questions, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.
You can also now follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/filmmakingpodcast!
#FilmmakingSucks

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I don’t go up to another film director and say, Boy, you are a great male film director.’ So what’s curious to me is why it’s so gender specific with me. I get a lot of questions about ‘How could you make a film with this kind of subject matter?’ How could you do this as a woman and a mother?’ My answer: women can be terrible! Have you ever been to high school? Girls have as much love in them as they have viciousness because they’re human beings. Violence and horror films are not gender specific.
— Jennifer Lynch

BONUS! Masters of Horror Panel from Fear NYC!

We attended the Fear NYC Horror Film Festival in October, and filmed the "Masters of Horror" panel hosted by Jay Kay of Horror Happens Radio, featuring producer and journalist Heather Buckley, Horror Historian Tyler Hixson, director Colin Adams-Toomey, Director & Actress Adrienne Lovette, and actor Nicholas Tucci. 

The panel discussed the past and future of horror, the importance of diversity in front of and behind the camera, the use of CGI in horror, indie filmmaking, budgets and so much more. 

Listen to HorrorHappens Radio hosted by Jay Kay every Tuesday afternoon at 4pm on HGRNJ.org and check out his future guests, as well as archived conversations and interviews at www.horrorhappens.com

Subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any questions, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.
You can also now follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/filmmakingpodcast!
#FilmmakingSucks

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Tips for a Successful Seed & Spark Campaign

Crowdfunding is becoming a huge part of independent film production. A few weeks back, we attended the Ax Wound Film Festival, and were able to attend a workshop hosted by Christina Raia discussing crowdfunding and specifically the platform Seed & Spark. 

She discussed methods of starting your campaign, perks you can offer, different ways of promoting your film, keeping in touch with your contributors, and getting others involved in your film, among many other methods of launching a successful crowdfunding campaign.

Subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any questions, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.
You can also now follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/filmmakingpodcast!
#FilmmakingSucks

 

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Before you even start building your crowdfunding page, Start building a crowd first.
— Roy Morejon

The Stuff You Need To Get Your Film Made

We're back! 
After a lengthy hiatus, which we totally didn't intend, we're finally back. This week, we discuss a panel we sat in on at the New York Short Film Festival, about How To Get our Feature Made, and cover some of the talking points hit by the panelist Rob Margolies. 

Is it the right time to make the film? Do you have the right script? The right people? The right locations? The right budget? We talk what is the "combination lock" that many producers consider to be the way to get your feature film made, and be successful. 

So, just keeping it short, lets get into the episode! 

Upcoming Events:
Krampus AP Film Festival in Asbury Park Dec 1st & 2nd, our short film Grub vom Krampus will be screening there.
The Northeast Film Festival Horror Fest at Teaneck Cinemas, Teaneck, NJ on Dec 6th & 7th, our newest feature Theta States will screen Dec 6th at 830pm. 
Bizarre Haunted Flea Market in Old Bethpage, NY Dec 9th & 10th, Grub vom Krampus will also play there, and we will be there with a vendors table selling DVDs and some of our horror-inspired art! 

Subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any questions, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.
You can also now follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/filmmakingpodcast!
#FilmmakingSucks

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When I was a kid, there was no collaboration; it’s you with a camera bossing your friends around. But as an adult, filmmaking is all about appreciating the talents of the people you surround yourself with and knowing you could never have made any of these films by yourself.
— Steven Spielberg

Breaking Out Of Your Personal Bubble

Happy month of Halloween! We've spent the last couple of weeks at different film festivals, including the Shawna Shea Film Festival and Brooklyn Horror Film Festival. On top of winning two awards, we watched a lot of excellent films, and learned a lot about ourselves, our strengths, our weaknesses and were able to realize what some of our near-future goals are. 

An important part of being able to grow and improve your craft is the ability to self-reflect, self-critique and look at your own work objectively. It's not the easiest thing to do, but it is imperative to your personal growth as a filmmaker and artist. On this episode we discuss what we've learned over the past few weeks and how we (and you!) can work to improve our films. 

November 4th at 9:30pm, Linsdays new film "Beneath" is screening as part of the New York Short Film Festival at Cinema Village in Manhattan! Tickets go on sale this week. Join us for the New York Premiere of Lindsays first film! 

Subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any questions, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.
You can also now follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/filmmakingpodcast!
#FilmmakingSucks

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I do not take constructive criticism from people who have never constructed anything.
— Eric Thomas

The Seven Basic Plots in Horror Movies

To kick off the Halloween Season, we have decided to attempt to cover subjects that relate directly to horror films for this month, and we kick it off with a conversation relating to something we recently spoke about in our Production Apps episode: The Seven Basic Plots.

In writing, generally all stories can fall into one of 7 basic plots, which are explained heavily in the book The Seven Basic Plots by Christopher Booker. By learning and understanding these guidelines for writing, you can gain a better perspective on your story, and will help you in creating more complex and interesting characters and stories. 

In a horror twist, we have decided to explain how these basic plot lines can be used in making great horror films. Every horror film ever made is the first plotline of "Overcoming The Monster" but what makes great horror is when you combine multiple structures into your stories. Using examples of some of the greatest horror films including The Shining, Alien, Rosemarys Baby, Nightbreed, Event Horizon, Night Of the Living Dead, and many others. 

Thursday, October 5th at 4pm is the New England Premiere of our film, Theta States! We will be the first film of the Shawna Shea Memorial Film Festival! Both of us will be on-hand for all three days of the fest, so please come on out to support this wonderful charity and celebrate independent artists and filmmakers. Tickets for the screening are only $10!
#SwagBag https://www.shawnasheaff.com/

You can find the Shawna Shea Memorial Foundation, where donations are welcome, here: http://www.shawnafoundation.org/

Subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any questions, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.
You can also now follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/filmmakingpodcast!
#FilmmakingSucks

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Scripts are what matter. If you get the foundations right and then you get the right ingredients on top, you stand a shot… but if you get those foundations wrong, then you absolutely don’t stand a shot. It’s very rare–almost never–that a good film gets made from a bad screenplay.
— Tim Bevan

Prepping Deliverables and Credit Blocks

When your movie is complete, and you've found distribution, there is a list of items that the distributor (or sales agent) will ask for so that they can properly package and sell your film. This is called your Deliverables.

This list contains very specific requirements for your film including the final rendered version, M+E tracks, 5.1 audio, specific codecs, your script, dialogue tracks, and more. Unfortunately, most filmmakers do not know what the list will include until they are presented with a distribution contract, in which case they are then forced to scramble to get it all done, only to realize some they sometimes cannot meet these requirements. This doesn't mean your deal is finished, but it does handcuff your distributor on how far they can push your film. So, this week we will discuss many of the items that are on that list of requirements, and help you to prepare for this list. 

On that list as well, your distributor will ask for the Credit Block, and while most think its just a list of people who worked on the film, it turns out the credit block is something that is a high point of contention and negotiation with actors, producers, directors and all the unions. So, we will explain each piece of the credit block who gets credited, how they get credited, the order they are credited in, and how you can use your credit block to negotiate with your cast and crew. 

October 5th at 4pm has been announced as the official New England Premiere of our film Theta States! We have been selected to be part of the Shawna Shea Foundation Film Festival, and will be the opening film of the festival! Both of us will be on-hand for all three days of the fest, so please come on out to support this wonderful charity and celebrate independent artists and filmmakers. #SwagBag https://www.shawnasheaff.com/

You can find the Shawna Shea Memorial Foundation, where donations are welcome, here: http://www.shawnafoundation.org/

Subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any questions, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.
We have also (contrary to what was said in this episode) opened our Facebook page, so you can now follow the podcast at www.facebook.com/filmmakingpodcast!
#FilmmakingSucks

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When a movie is about to come out on its initial debut, there are a lot of people involved - the financiers, the studio and the producers and also, many times, the foreign distributors. So it is a time of tremendous pressure and uncertainty.
— Francis Ford Coppola

Low Cost Production Apps and Programs


This week on Filmmaking Sucks we discuss some of the low-cost production apps and programs which will help to streamline your production, especially wen shooting with a small crew!

We begin discussing CineSummit 7, which will go live next week, Sept 12&13. Cinesummit presents numerous video lectures and seminars over the course of two days, taught by industry professionals, and is completely free! Check out this great yearly resource of knowledge and information that can help bring your productions to the next level.

After that, if there's one thing you can never have too many of is apps and programs that make production smoother. So we discuss a few of the programs we use ourselves. Some are cheap, some are not, and some are free! We'll discuss what each program does, and how you can utilize it on your next production!

Wednesday, Sept 13th is the premiere screening of our newest short, An Act Of Concession at Neirs Tavern in Woodhaven, Queens! Free to attend, so come on out, see some indie films, along with ours, and #SupportIndieFilm!

October 5th at 4pm has been announced as the official New England Premiere of our film Theta States! We have been selected to be part of the Shawna Shea Foundation Film Festival, and will be the opening film of the festival! Both of us will be on-hand for all three days of the fest, so please come on out to support this wonderful charity and celebrate independent artists and filmmakers. #SwagBag https://www.shawnasheaff.com/

You can find the Shawna Shea Memorial Foundation, where donations are welcome, here: http://www.shawnafoundation.org/

Subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any questions, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.
We have also (contrary to what was said in this episode) opened our Facebook page, so you can now follow the podcast at www.facebook.com/filmmakingpodcast!
#FilmmakingSucks

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