Mass Grave Pictures

Mass Grave Pictures, NYC based indie horror film productions.  #supportindiehorror 

Breaking Out Of Your Personal Bubble

Happy month of Halloween! We've spent the last couple of weeks at different film festivals, including the Shawna Shea Film Festival and Brooklyn Horror Film Festival. On top of winning two awards, we watched a lot of excellent films, and learned a lot about ourselves, our strengths, our weaknesses and were able to realize what some of our near-future goals are. 

An important part of being able to grow and improve your craft is the ability to self-reflect, self-critique and look at your own work objectively. It's not the easiest thing to do, but it is imperative to your personal growth as a filmmaker and artist. On this episode we discuss what we've learned over the past few weeks and how we (and you!) can work to improve our films. 

November 4th at 9:30pm, Linsdays new film "Beneath" is screening as part of the New York Short Film Festival at Cinema Village in Manhattan! Tickets go on sale this week. Join us for the New York Premiere of Lindsays first film! 

Subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any questions, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.
You can also now follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/filmmakingpodcast!
#FilmmakingSucks

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I do not take constructive criticism from people who have never constructed anything.
— Eric Thomas

The Seven Basic Plots in Horror Movies

To kick off the Halloween Season, we have decided to attempt to cover subjects that relate directly to horror films for this month, and we kick it off with a conversation relating to something we recently spoke about in our Production Apps episode: The Seven Basic Plots.

In writing, generally all stories can fall into one of 7 basic plots, which are explained heavily in the book The Seven Basic Plots by Christopher Booker. By learning and understanding these guidelines for writing, you can gain a better perspective on your story, and will help you in creating more complex and interesting characters and stories. 

In a horror twist, we have decided to explain how these basic plot lines can be used in making great horror films. Every horror film ever made is the first plotline of "Overcoming The Monster" but what makes great horror is when you combine multiple structures into your stories. Using examples of some of the greatest horror films including The Shining, Alien, Rosemarys Baby, Nightbreed, Event Horizon, Night Of the Living Dead, and many others. 

Thursday, October 5th at 4pm is the New England Premiere of our film, Theta States! We will be the first film of the Shawna Shea Memorial Film Festival! Both of us will be on-hand for all three days of the fest, so please come on out to support this wonderful charity and celebrate independent artists and filmmakers. Tickets for the screening are only $10!
#SwagBag https://www.shawnasheaff.com/

You can find the Shawna Shea Memorial Foundation, where donations are welcome, here: http://www.shawnafoundation.org/

Subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any questions, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.
You can also now follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/filmmakingpodcast!
#FilmmakingSucks

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Scripts are what matter. If you get the foundations right and then you get the right ingredients on top, you stand a shot… but if you get those foundations wrong, then you absolutely don’t stand a shot. It’s very rare–almost never–that a good film gets made from a bad screenplay.
— Tim Bevan

Prepping Deliverables and Credit Blocks

When your movie is complete, and you've found distribution, there is a list of items that the distributor (or sales agent) will ask for so that they can properly package and sell your film. This is called your Deliverables.

This list contains very specific requirements for your film including the final rendered version, M+E tracks, 5.1 audio, specific codecs, your script, dialogue tracks, and more. Unfortunately, most filmmakers do not know what the list will include until they are presented with a distribution contract, in which case they are then forced to scramble to get it all done, only to realize some they sometimes cannot meet these requirements. This doesn't mean your deal is finished, but it does handcuff your distributor on how far they can push your film. So, this week we will discuss many of the items that are on that list of requirements, and help you to prepare for this list. 

On that list as well, your distributor will ask for the Credit Block, and while most think its just a list of people who worked on the film, it turns out the credit block is something that is a high point of contention and negotiation with actors, producers, directors and all the unions. So, we will explain each piece of the credit block who gets credited, how they get credited, the order they are credited in, and how you can use your credit block to negotiate with your cast and crew. 

October 5th at 4pm has been announced as the official New England Premiere of our film Theta States! We have been selected to be part of the Shawna Shea Foundation Film Festival, and will be the opening film of the festival! Both of us will be on-hand for all three days of the fest, so please come on out to support this wonderful charity and celebrate independent artists and filmmakers. #SwagBag https://www.shawnasheaff.com/

You can find the Shawna Shea Memorial Foundation, where donations are welcome, here: http://www.shawnafoundation.org/

Subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any questions, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.
We have also (contrary to what was said in this episode) opened our Facebook page, so you can now follow the podcast at www.facebook.com/filmmakingpodcast!
#FilmmakingSucks

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When a movie is about to come out on its initial debut, there are a lot of people involved - the financiers, the studio and the producers and also, many times, the foreign distributors. So it is a time of tremendous pressure and uncertainty.
— Francis Ford Coppola

Low Cost Production Apps and Programs


This week on Filmmaking Sucks we discuss some of the low-cost production apps and programs which will help to streamline your production, especially wen shooting with a small crew!

We begin discussing CineSummit 7, which will go live next week, Sept 12&13. Cinesummit presents numerous video lectures and seminars over the course of two days, taught by industry professionals, and is completely free! Check out this great yearly resource of knowledge and information that can help bring your productions to the next level.

After that, if there's one thing you can never have too many of is apps and programs that make production smoother. So we discuss a few of the programs we use ourselves. Some are cheap, some are not, and some are free! We'll discuss what each program does, and how you can utilize it on your next production!

Wednesday, Sept 13th is the premiere screening of our newest short, An Act Of Concession at Neirs Tavern in Woodhaven, Queens! Free to attend, so come on out, see some indie films, along with ours, and #SupportIndieFilm!

October 5th at 4pm has been announced as the official New England Premiere of our film Theta States! We have been selected to be part of the Shawna Shea Foundation Film Festival, and will be the opening film of the festival! Both of us will be on-hand for all three days of the fest, so please come on out to support this wonderful charity and celebrate independent artists and filmmakers. #SwagBag https://www.shawnasheaff.com/

You can find the Shawna Shea Memorial Foundation, where donations are welcome, here: http://www.shawnafoundation.org/

Subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any questions, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.
We have also (contrary to what was said in this episode) opened our Facebook page, so you can now follow the podcast at www.facebook.com/filmmakingpodcast!
#FilmmakingSucks

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How To Prep With Your Director of Photography

Film is a visual medium, and your Director Of Photography is the person who will bring your visual story to life. They help you craft the story through lenses, angles, lighting, movement and color. But, they are incapable of bringing your vision to life if they are ill-prepared. 

This week, we discuss a few of the basic elements of your film that needs to be decided upon during pre-production, so your DP can do their job efficiently, and create the film you set out to make.

If you are in the NYC area, come on out to Lovecraft Bar NYC on Friday, August 25th and join us for a screening of three of our short films, among many others, as we celebrate the 127th Birthday of HP Lovecraft! #HBHP
https://www.facebook.com/events/718929351624306/permalink/732927853557789/

October 6th-8th has been announced as the official New England Premiere of our film Theta States! We have been selected to be part of the Shawna Shea Foundation Film Festival. Both of us will be on-hand for the weekend, so please come on out to support this wonderful charity and celebrate independent artists and filmmakers. #SwagBag https://www.shawnasheaff.com/

You can find the Shawna Shea Memorial Foundation, where donations are welcome, here: http://www.shawnafoundation.org/

Subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any questions, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.
We have also (contrary to what was said in this episode) opened our Facebook page, so you can now follow the podcast at www.facebook.com/filmmakingpodcast!
#FilmmakingSucks

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And later I thought, I can’t think how anyone can become a director without learning the craft of cinematography. I was very glad later when I was directing that I wasn’t in the hands of a cinematographer and hoping that he would do it well. I would know what he was doing, and we could discuss how that scene would look. It was just lucky in a way that I didn’t go to film school and just learnt all this on the floor.
— Nicolas Roeg

No-Budget Filmmaking Hacks

Keeping things low-budget can be difficult, and there are many things indie filmmakers do to stretch their budgets as far as possible. 

This week, we discuss a few of the methods we have used in the past to achieve professional results on an amateur budget. From home-made (and safe!) squibs and blood pumps, how to create a gun muzzle blast with ANY editing software, to inexpensive lighting diffusion and a $5 follow focus. We hit on all of these, plus more items that will help you get that shot you've always wanted, but thought you couldn't afford. 

Come on out to Lovecraft Bar NYC on Friday, August 25th at 6pm and join us for the HP Lovecraft 127th Birthday Party, and check out three of our short films there; Sleepless, The Au Pair and Knock Knock! 

50 Avenue B, New York NY, 10009
$5 entry donation, one drink purchase mine
21+ event.
HORROR Readings 6pm - 9pm
BANDS 9pm -midnight
HORROR ART SHOW/FILMS 6pm - midnight

Subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any questions, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.
We have also (contrary to what was said in this episode) opened our Facebook page, so you can now follow the podcast at www.facebook.com/filmmakingpodcast!
#FilmmakingSucks

Even a low-budget film costs way more money than a high-priced record. So, it’s mo’ money, mo’ problems. When you have more money, it just creates more people trying to get involved and you have more trouble.
— Rob Zombie

Directors: What You Need To Know Before Shooting

On most Low and No-Budget films, the director is usually also the writer, and producer, sometimes camera operator and editor as well. With all of these hats to wear, there are a few key components to being a director that you need to know and have to consider before shooting your film. 

There's more to making a film that just writing it then grabbing a bunch of your buddies and calling yourself a director. Wanting to help you make the most out of your limited budget and means, pre-production is a big part of your film, and its not just for producers. Directors answer many important questions during pre-production that will allow them to walk onto the set ready, with a clear head and on a definitive track of what you're getting out of this movie. This week, we discuss some of the duties of the director, and how to mentally prepare yourself for your film, shooting, editing and the release.

We also cover some of the things we have been working on, updates on Lindsays' new film, and a few of the people we've been working with lately, as well as a slight touch on post-production audio. 

Subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any questions, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.
We have also (contrary to what was said in this episode) opened our Facebook page, so you can now follow the podcast at www.facebook.com/filmmakingpodcast!
#FilmmakingSucks

Your film is like your children. You might want a child with certain qualities, but you are never going to get the exact specification right. The film has a privilege to live its own life and develop its own character. To suppress this is dangerous. It is an approach that works the other way too: sometimes the footage has amazing qualities that you did not expect
— Werner Herzog

48 Hour Film Races - Shooting Under Pressure

Film Races are something we've always enjoyed doing, ever since we began making movies. Our first film race was in 2007 for the Alamo Drafthouse Bloodshots Competition. We have competed in three others since then, we hosted a panel discussion about them at Macabre Faire in 2014, and Manny recently was a judge for the Madison, WI wing of The 48 Hour Film Project contest. 

This week on the podcast, we discuss our time spent competing in these races, how we got the work done, and tell you about the three films we shot over the last two weeks, which have taken up all of our time, which is the reason we haven't had a new episode! haha

If you want to check out our Annabelle-Inspired short at MyAnnabelleCreation.com: go to View Gallery and click the one labeled "Manny S. Woodhaven, NY" and help us get noticed by the Filmchilla Film Festival by posting on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram the hashtags #Filmchilla, #ChillaContest and #ThetaStates, and if you bought a ticket already, or or planning to buy a ticket, please tell them Theta States sent you!

Subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any questions, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.
We have also (contrary to what was said in this episode) opened our Facebook page, so you can now follow the podcast at www.facebook.com/filmmakingpodcast!
#FilmmakingSucks

I’m under pressure with all my films. And the reason we are always under pressure is because it’s only in our profession that months and even years of hard work is judged by the first show on Friday.
— Mahesh Babu

First Day On Your First Film With A 5 Person Crew

Your first film set can be a big undertaking, and you need to be prepared or your filmmaking journey will be over before it begins.
Where do I shoot?
What do I need?
What should I prepare for?
How many people do I need on my crew?
Who does what??
Do I seriously have to feed everyone?!
Having started out with a 4 person crew years ago, and to this day, we still attempt to keep our crews as small and efficient as possible, we will discuss all of these questions, and more on this episode!

Subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any questions, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.
We have also (contrary to what was said in this episode) opened our Facebook page, so you can now follow the podcast at www.facebook.com/filmmakingpodcast!
#FilmmakingSucks

I’m probably in the car on the way to the studio. Which, as it happens, reminds me of a conversation I had with Steven Spielberg about what was the most difficult and challenging thing about directing a film. And I believe Steven summed it up about as profoundly as you can. He thought the most difficult and challenging thing about directing a film was getting out of the car. I’m sure you all know the feeling.
— Stanley Kubrick's DW Griffith Award Acceptance Speech

How To Network w/Writer-Director Louie Cortes

This week Manny and Lindsay sit down with filmmaker, and long-time collaborator Louie Cortes. Together, the three of us as written, produced and directed our first feature film, Blood Slaughter Massacre, our web-series-turned-featurette, The Attack Of The Brain People, and a number of short films, including Louies' web series Holidays Of Terror. When we began working separately, creatively, Louie produced Good Day with us on crew, and we produced Theta States, with him on crew.

Last week, we discussed how to Micro-Budget your script, and we mentioned how one of the biggest assets in doing low/no budget films is having a crew that you collaborate with regularly. These people will be there on your sets, and you will be on their sets. Rather than you paying them $200 per day, and then they paying you $200 a day right back, you work, indebted to each other, with the combined purpose of getting your projects done and out into the world. All of our films began from simply seeing each other on the subway one day, and talking. That's all there is to networking and building your creative group. 

Today we'll discuss the ways we have met the many members of our regular crew, and the multitude of other places you can find filmmakers, actors, and other creatives! 

Check out Louies work and films at www.newneedleproductions.com 

Subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any questions, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.

 

I think the movie business and film crews are a little bit like the circus, in that we travel around like a pack and we’re a big family for a finite period of time. We roll into someplace, cause a bunch of damage, and then roll out.
— Francis Lawrence

How To MicroBudget Your Script

We're back! Our computer unfortunately died on us (we did discuss it during the recording, but that turned into a 20+ minute discussion, so it was cut. we'll cover the issue we had on a future episode discussing hardware and software you can use!) so we've been away trying to sort that all out, install the new PC, and get everything up and running.

Two weeks ago, Lindsay was on one of our favorite Filmmaking podcasts, Making Movies Is Hard, and she discussed their prospects of making their own first feature film and how to re-work their budget to affordable levels. So, this week, we give you our response to that interview, and talk about how we keep our budgets down for our films. 

We discuss our own methods and experiences producing the films Blood Slaughter Massacre, Theta States, Good Day, Attack Of The Brain People, Zombie Hunters: City Of The Dead, and the countless short films we've worked on over the past 12 years. The people who we've worked for free for, the favors we've asked for, and fulfilled, bartering your services for assistance, supporting other filmmakers, finding locations for cheap or free, and most importantly, getting your film done at a price you can afford. 

Check out the links below for some of the films, podcasts and videos we discussed in this episode, and get to making your first film!

Making Movies Is Hard! Podcast (Lindsay can be heard on Episode 104)
Mark Duplass - SXSW Keynote
Zombie Hunters: City of the Dead
Madison 48 Hour Film Project

Subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any questions, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.

Who gives the fuck about the cavalry? You are the cavalry. You have a group of friends that needs your support. As they get more successful and you make a shitty movie, they will lift you up. This will equalize you. You have a bevy of work behind you and not one of those are you embarrassed to show your children later on. Most importantly, you’re now in a corner of the sandbox that is completely your own. No one can stop you from doing exactly what you want to do. If you can accept that the cavalry won’t come, and if you can be the cavalry, it gives you a chance to be happy.
— Mark Duplass

What are Development Funds?

Manny and Lindsay take on a subject that many independent filmmakers are unaware of this week, and that is Development Funds. This area of your budget is not always necessary, and it depends on what your film budget is actually going to be. 
What are development funds? Where does this money come from? When do you pay it back (if at all)? How does this affect your films budget as a whole? Where do you investors fit into this fund?
As part of NYU's Tisch School of the Arts Women Filmmakers series, we sat in on the "Working Above the Micro-Budget Level" Workshop with Naomi McDougall Jones and Sarah Wharton where this was discussed. So we got this straight from two sources who have done it themselves, and we are here to share what we learned with you. 

Catch us at the Severed VHS Trade and Short Film Night, this Saturday May 27th, where we will be premiering our new short film, Knock Knock, and we will have a table for the day. Grab tickets here: www.shermantheater.com/?e=event&eventId=21952&rDate=5/27/2017
And Sunday May 28th, you can see our new film Theta States at the First Contact Film Festival at 2:40pm, along with a full day of other indie horror and scifi films. Tickets are $10 for the day, and you can get them here: filmfreeway.com/festival/firstcontact/tickets

Subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any questions, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.

When you’re making an independent film, it’s like this actor plus this actor equals this funding, this financing. Pull this actor out, this actor is still here but this money’s gone. It’s this frightening puzzle mosaic that is the world of independent film.
— Jill Soloway

Books Vs Scripts w/ Author Loren Molloy

This week on Filmmaking Sucks, Manny and Lindsay sit down with author Loren Molloy to discuss the differences between writing a book vs a script. Besides the obvious format differences, when writing a novel, the creator tends to be less restricted in their story writing, but there still must be some level of constraint. With a script, you must be stricter with your writing, but more can be left open to interpretation, so it can be left available to create on set. 

We also get into the hot debate of the movies vs the novel/comics and discuss a few other subjects regarding them. 

You can find Loren Molloys books at lorenmolloy.com and see her at the upcoming shows Scare A Con and Grindhouse Night at Cafe Z!

Subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any questions, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.

I love the movies, and when I go to see a movie that’s been made from one of my books, I know that it isn’t going to be exactly like my novel because a lot of other people have interpreted it. But I also know it has an idea that I’ll like because that idea occurred to me, and I spent a year, or a year and a half of my life working on it.
— Stephen King

Working Conventions

This week on Filmmaking Sucks, Lindsay and Manny discuss what is like working the convention circuit. Many indie filmmakers, especially those in the horror genre, decide to forego the traditional distribution route, and opt instead to sell their films themselves by running tables at conventions like Monster Mania, Chiller Theatre, Horrorhound, Texas Frightmare, Cinema Wasteland, and more. 
Here on the North-East coast, the convention circuit filmmakers are like a family, and these events are like a reunion to us. We love doing the shows, seeing each other, sometimes filming in the hotels, and hanging out with everyone. We'll discuss many of the perks, and the not-so-perks of choosing this path. The costs involved, the legalities, and the benefits of building relationships within this community. 
We also discuss how working conventions differ from doing film festivals, and our personal feelings on the two venues. 

You can catch us vending at the Severed Film Fest at the Sherman Theater on May 27th in Stroudsberg, PA and for the screening of Theta States at 2:40pm at the First Contact Film Festival on May 28th, at Camp Jefferson in Lake Hopatcong, NJ!
Subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any questions, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.

Profile Image credit to Todd Staruch

The Horrors of Producing a TV Series

This week, Scott W. Perry joins Manny and Lindsay again to discuss his series "In Fear Of." 

Producing a TV or Web Series is a long process and big commitment. With many moving parts and different directors on each episode, the production can balloon very quickly and just as quickly it can go off the rails. With the success of In Fear Of behind him, Scott tells us many of the pitfalls he experiences, from running out of money, pitching to producers, directors walking off set and the fallout from the burning of friendships.

This is one episode that truly lives up to the title of "Filmmaking Sucks" and proves that time, patience, and perseverance are your greatest assets. If you've experienced a bad shoot, or a failed production, then this discussion proves you're not alone and that giving up is not an option. 

You can find Scott W. Perrys web series In Fear of on Facebook at facebook.com/InFearOf and on twitter at @scottwperry1977. 

Subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any questions, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.

 

To be a film-maker, you have to lead. You have to be psychotic in your desire to do something. People always like the easy route. You have to push very hard to get something unusual, something different.
— Danny Boyle

The Writers Process w/Scott Perry

Every writer has a process, and it's different for each one. This week, Manny and Lindsay sit down with writer/producer/director Scott W. Perry and discuss the process of completing a script. 

Scott is the producer of the web series "In Fear Of" where he worked with over a dozen directors and writers. In a situation like that, you learn the art of collaboration, and in that comes the true form of filmmaking, but it all begins with the script. 

There are also certain guidelines that can be used when writing a script, which can help you move your screenplay forward when you're stuck. There are also other things which producers will look for when reading a script, and we will discuss what some of these guidelines are, and how you can get a producers attention, without them actually reading your script. 

From the writing of Joseph Campbell and Syd Field, to finding inspiration, knowing your characters, creating a world, setting your themes, and writing for TV vs film, there are many parts to a good screenplay, and we discuss each of them on this in-depth episode of Filmmaking Sucks!

You can find Scott W. Perrys web series In Fear of on Facebook at facebook.com/InFearOf and on twitter at @scottwperry1977. 

Subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any questions, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.

One thing that helps is to give myself permission to write badly. I tell myself that I’m going to do my five or 10 pages no matter what, and that I can always tear them up the following morning if I want. I’ll have lost nothing—writing and tearing up five pages would leave me no further behind than if I took the day off.
— Lawrence Block

On-Set Horror Stories!

We're back! This week, in what is possibly our least structured episode yet, we have a conversation with teenage filmmaker, Anthony Edward Curry. Anthony, who began making his first feature film at 13 years old and completing it at 15, has since gone on to working on numerous indie projects with many of the NY/NJ Indie Filmmakers, including a number of other young filmmakers he came up with. 
Throughout the conversation, we talk with him about his first film, Movie Night, as well as his current film, other projects he is working on, how he finds new work, networking, and staying busy.
Discussing some of our own personal on-set horror stories, we prove that you're never too old (or young) to make mistakes. Fighting to make your indie film perfect, buying blood vs making blood, and someone close to Anthony was in The Warriors!
You can find Anthony on Facebook and Instagram, as well as his production companies Mayhem Films and Ouroboros Films.

Subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any questions, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.

I hope that in this year to come, you make mistakes. Because if you are making mistakes, then you are making new things, trying new things, learning, living, pushing yourself, changing yourself, changing your world. You’re doing things you’ve never done before, and more importantly, you’re doing something.
— Neil Gaiman

Why You Need A Producer During Production

Hiring a good producer is so important to you film, we needed two weeks to explain it. The day-of filming is the most important moment for your film, and if you're directing, the only thing you should be concerned with is getting what you need on-screen. We're sure you're setting up lights, working with actors, telling your cameraman what you want, running scenes, etc. The producers key responsibility is to create an environment where everyone can do their obs properly. Whether it be negotiating extra time with your location owner, making sure the food arrives when you need it to, getting talent or crew to set (or home) if a problem arises..

The producer is your problem solver for the day. We will explain all of this to you, with a few nightmare stories of our own, and hopefully we can convince you that you do in fact need a producer for your film.

Subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any question, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.

If two men on the same job agree all the time, then one is useless. If they disagree all the time, both are useless.
— Darryl F. Zanuck

Why You Need A Producer

Hiring a producer can be expensive, so many indie filmmakers write and direct their own films, which is just fine. But then, they decide "I'll do it myself" when it comes to producing, and they don't realize how much they have actually hurt their film by making that decision.

The truth is, it's because most don't actually know what the producer is supposed to do, and how much work truly goes into their job. Maybe you cant afford a real producer, but you do need to find someone to work as your producer. This week, we will cover the many things a producer does to get your film up off the ground and running during Pre-Production. 

From creating your production bible, to character breakdowns, to equipment and props lists, hiring department heads, breaking down the script, location scouting, casting, budgeting, scheduling and so much more. 

Listen in as we discuss everything a producer does for your film during the pre-production process on Filmmaking Sucks!

 

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“It doesn’t have anything to do with the budget of the film. It has to do with the scope and scale of ambition, and the skill that people brought to it to realize that ambition.”– James Schamus

The Casting Process

Actors. You can't make a movie without them! Obviously... well then lets talk!
How do you find them? How do you cast them? How do you pay them? SHOULD you pay them?
Is your friends brother the best choice? Are you an actor? Would you like to be an actor? 
We cover all these topics and more, along with a few casting do's, don't and a couple of horror stories of our own, this week on Filmmaking Sucks!

Subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Google Play, or your favorite podcatching app. And don't forget to rate and review us! Email us at filmmakingsucks@gmail.com with any question, comments, or subjects you'd like to hear us discuss.

Casting directors tend to be the unsung heroes in this business.
— Brent Sexton